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Ag in Action 2017

34

Get Rocked

by

Now supplying riprap, sand and gravel.

Call us for road repair, dam repair &

erosion problems. We have loaders, dozers,

scrapers, rollers and motor patrols ready to

fix your problems. Free estimates.

538-7160 • 800-538-7160

201 Meadowbrook Dr. • Lewistown

Box 773 • Hilger, MT 59451

Larry Bielen

Hilger

Meats

Custom Processing

on all your farm animals.

Bulk Hamburger & Hamburger Patties

Wild Game Specialities

(No whole carcasses, please.)

3 Varieties of Jerky

13 Varieties of Sausage

f

29 years of continuing

quality service with

satisfaction guaranteed.

406-538-2619

31

Moving panels is a difficult chore that absolutely requires

working together. Dad pushed, I pulled, we would stumble and

there were words... We would lower and widen the arms of the

Hydra Bed so the spinners on the ends were close to the height

of the panels. We would stand the panels in a stack just under

the spinners at the end of the arms so the weight of the panels

was against the arms. When we had the desired number of

panels chained on the spinners, we would lift the whole mess for

transport.

That sounds reasonable enough, except the hydraulic pump on

the Hydra Bed would lose oil and unless the pickup was running,

the arms would settle. Unfortunately, the Dodge did not have a

reliable emergency brake so we could not leave it running. If we

did not have the panels balanced perfectly, the whole shebang

would crash to the ground. That is about 800 pounds that one

person simply cannot or should not attempt to hold up.

Hence, Ranch Rule number one: Let Go and Jump Back!

(In direct opposition, I might add, to Dad’s original mandate.)

Eventually, stacking the panels against something other than the

Hydra Bed arms before we chained them for transport became

the norm.

The Dodge became the chief workhouse on the ranch and gave

rise tomany interesting adventures as well as Ranch Rule number

two: Sometimes you just have to ride away. More on that later.

Continued from page 33